Android App Ratings & Reviews

The Android and iOS Rivalry – Cosmetic and Functional

by On April 28, 2014

Android and iOS Rivalry

Bias throws any hint of fair assessment out the window. Even with independent reviews in consideration, there’s the suspicion that not all ground has been covered, not enough to justify the verdict at the end of a review. This has been the challenge in comparisons, especially in consumer electronics. For the longest time, Sony and Nintendo were caught in a bitter console war, until Microsoft stepped into the picture and redefined the playing field. The same is true with the ongoing rivalry between Android and iOS, both with technical merits and lapses of their own. So how do you evaluate these without siding for the OS installed in your portable device? Many favor either without even giving the competition a chance to prove its worth.

Crash Test

The competing OS are only as good as their latest updates, even though many users consider earlier versions as comfort zones that will do, at least for the moment. The initial test is in the upgrade, if it fares better than its predecessors did. This is often calibrated with a crash test, maximizing use of the OS until it tanks or underperforms. The iOS 7.1 has improved over iOS 6 at a 1.7% crash rate, but this is still at a significant disadvantage to the Android Kitkat, with only 0.7% crashes (figures are based on activity logs from over a billion users).

Adoption and Upgrade Preferences

In a matter of preference, the Android and iOS camps are bitterly divided, but there’s an ongoing consensus against the Android Kitkat and its incompatibility with many third-party applications. This is understandable, though, given the plethora of Android apps available, both in their beta and final versions. An 85% adoption rate for the iOS, in comparison to Android’s 8%, is indicative of the reception for both OS, although subject to change.

android and ios

Seamless and Efficient Design

The iOS interface has been overhauled in favor of simplicity, to ensure efficient and convenient navigation. You can pull up a Control Center menu to tweak utilities and connection options, and you can always customize the icons and font to improve readability and navigation. Most of the improvements are cosmetic, but these serve the purpose of having an interface that’s more user-friendly.

In contrast, Android’s menus (settings and prompts) are still seamless and merged, allowing you to swipe towards each with ease. The home screen is still customizable, but there’s a sense that the entire setup is a bit clunky, if not strained. Android’s Kitkat offers better autocorrect functions, with several suggestions placed above the text field. iOS presents these with bubbles on top of words, but somewhat gets in the way of proper input.

Android and iOS Navigation

There’s nothing to complain about in terms of scrolling and zooming, the response is great for both the Android and iOS. There are features ported over from previous versions, though, such as the Android’s Apps Drawer and the iOS’s jump-to-top-of-page status bar. The highlight, copy, and paste commands still need tweaking, but don’t set back the improvements. You could say the changes were superficial instead of functional, but it’s a big leap just the same, and it’s possible these are market tests for compatibility, in preparation for the next wave of revolutionary devices set to roll out in the coming months.

Lionel Luigi Lopez is a business writer, entrepreneur and a musician. He is also an active blogger and marketing strategist. He runs a small business in Manila and still active in music.
Follow him on twitter @lionelluigi

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