Android App Ratings & Reviews

Can we really trust Google?

by On September 12, 2013

google

When I’m asked if I trust Google, I have to say that trust doesn’t come by default, it has to be earned first. In the beginning, we all trusted the good ol’ Google with our private data, because they promised they will keep it secure. Fair warning, it’s not only Google in this position, but they are THE tech company, the giant, the alpha and omega, they should set the standard in my opinion.

After Edward Snowden showed up with the documents which proved beyond any doubt that ALL major tech companies were/are in bed with Big Brother, providing the National Security Agency (and others)  with access to their mainframes/networks/systems/source code/encryption algorithms  and the like and receiving millions of dollars for that from taxpayers, questions about how much can we trust third parties with our personal data began to emerge.

Google recently announced that they are increasing their efforts to providing a safer encryption method for the information that flows through its data centers across the world. This move is supposedly making NSA’s snooping job on our “private” communications more difficult.

Question is, can we trust Google&comp, again, taking their word for granted?

When asked about details, like the costs of the operation, the number of data centers and the encryption methods that will be used, Google officials declined to answer.

Anyway, according to Snowden, NSA is capable of cracking basically any encryption method, including the famous Tor anonymity network, which actually was compromised recently by the FBI, so Snowden is proven to be dead right in his “leaks”.

google

Even if Google will encrypt the information, it will still be intercepted by the NSA and the encryption will be actually useless if/when the US government will make legal requirements to tech companies to provide data.

A tech security expert, Bruce Schneier, was quoted saying that the US government has betrayed the Internet and that we cannot trust it to be the ethical compass when it comes to internet privacy.

All companies which were revealed to be working with the NSA/Big Brother initially denied their involvement and some even said that they had no idea about the PRISM program. Now Google came forward with the juicy details about its “business” with the NSA, in a PR attempt of “cleaning house”.

But guess what: a few days ago, Google asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit which tries to forbid Google to scan the content of private emails on its mail service Gmail, that is supposedly used ONLY for target advertising using keywords that appear in your private messages. If you believe that, boy, I have a bridge to sell to you.

So much with cleaning house, privacy and all the sweet talk.

 

 

 

 

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